2021 – International Year for the Elimination of Child Labour – GSIJP Office Made a 2021 Action Pledge

In July 2019, the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) unanimously adopted a resolution declaring 2021 as the International Year for the Elimination of Child Labour, and has asked the International Labour Organization (ILO) to take the lead in its implementation. The resolution highlights the commitments of the Member States “to take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms.”… This is the exact wording of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal 8, Target 7 which gives rise to Alliance 8.7, an inclusive global partnership committeed to achieving SDG 8.7 with the objectives of (i) accelerating action, (ii) conducting research and knowledge sharings,(iii) driving innovaton and (iv) leveraging resources. There are 4 years remaining to 2025 so how are we doing? ILO reports ‘child labour has decreased by 38 per cent in the last decade … the COVID-19 pandemic has considerably worsened the situation, but joint and decisive action can reverse this trend.’ Will we see zero child labour in 2025?   For the World Day to End Child Labour, (June 12) the ILO and UNICEF will release new global estimates and trends on child labour (2016-2020), under the aegis of Alliance 8.7. I wonder what the number will be like compared to the 2016 estimates?

Well, to start only 22 of 192 countries have signed up to be ‘pathfinder countries in ending child labour – Albania, Cameroon, Chile, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Guatemala, Honduras, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Nepal, Nigeria, Peru, Sri Lanka, Tunisia, Uganda, Vietnam Good Shepherd has a presence in 10 of these countries – 6 are in Latin America and the Carribean, 3 in Asia Pacific and I in Africa. Only 6 (Chile, Mexico, Peru, Madagascar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Vietnam) of the of the 10 countries where we are present have posted materials under the following headings – Challenges, Milestones, Priorities, Progress and Updates.

Read More español  français  italiano  português  Русский 

In the above statistics there is no mention of human trafficking or prostitution, yet it is referenced either directly or indirectly in three counties. In Chile “70.6% of children in child labour aged 5 to 17 are engaged in hazardous child labour. Children are also involved in other worst forms of child labour, including commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking. Indigenous children and adolescents from Ecuador are especially vulnerable to human trafficking for labour exploitation in Chile. Commonly, children are forced to steal, produce, sell, and transport drugs near the border with Peru and Bolivia.”

For Madagascar we read ‘the worst forms of child labour include commercial exploitation and trafficking. In 2007 4.5% of Malagasy children were trafficked, often for domestic work. Trafficking, both transnational and internal, is not uncommon in Madagascar. Though data is scant, evidence indicates that victims are trafficked for sexual exploitation, forces labour, domestic work, and forced begging.”

For Nepal “More than 31,000 people were estimated to be in forced labour in 2017, out of which 17% were children. Practices of forced labour and trafficking have been documented both in the country (for example, in the adult entertainment sector) and across borders.”

The ILO Convention No. 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labour  achieved universal ratification in August 2020 when the last of the 187 member States of the ILO formally deposited their ratification insturments. The Convention was adopted in 1999 and has taken 21 years to achieve universal ratification. That is one measure of success, but has the Convention been domesticated and is it being implemented?

Reading ILO Convention 182 in the light of our Position Paper on the Girl Child sheds more light on the girls’ vulnerability to ‘the worst form of child labour.’ Our paper references sexual abuse, use as objects in protstitution and child labor. Article 2 of the Convention defines the term ‘the worst forms of child labour:’

  • (a) all forms of slavery or practices similar to slavery, such as the sale and trafficking of children, debt bondage and serfdom and forced or compulsory labour, including forced or compulsory recruitment of children for use in armed conflict;
  • (b) the use, procuring or offering of a child for prostitution, for the production of pornography or for pornographic performances;
  • (c) the use, procuring or offering of a child for illicit activities, in particular for the production and trafficking of drugs as defined in the relevant international treaties;
  • (d) work which, by its nature or the circumstances in which it is carried out, is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children.

Snippets from the Pathfinder Countries in the Alliance 8.7 contain only three referrence to commercial sexual exploitation of children. Why is this? Will the updated global estimates that will be released on June 12th highlight the new criminal phonomenon of ‘Online Sexual Exploitation of Children’ (OSEC)? The International Justice Mission published a study in 2020 Online Sexual Exploitation of Children in the Philippines: Analysis and Recommendations for Governments, Industry, and Civil Society in which they noted that OSEC is a complex, hidden crime that is particularly challenging for the global community to measure and address. The lack of global OSEC data, inconsistencies in collecting, sharing and analysing data, across countries and agencies is one thing. This difficulty is further complicated by the complexity of internet-facilitated crimes which has made it almost impossible to accurately track, study and understand this crime. The estimated number/prevalence rate of IP addresses used for Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) each year more than tripled from 23,333 in 2014 to 81, 723 in 2017. This corresponds to a growth in the prevalence rate from about 43 out of every 10,000 IP addresses being used for CSE in 2014 to 149 out of every 10,000 IP addresses being used for CSE in 2017. Due to limitations in the data, it is not clear if this increase was reflective of an actual rise in the occurrence of the crime, a rise in the reporting of the crime, or both.

Another study conducted by Associate Professors Michael Salter and Tim Wong, and funded by the Australian eSafety Commissioner (2021) highlights the way COVID-19 has placed children at risk of online sexual exploitation and abuse – and how across the world, those put in place to protect children from such violence are facing unprecedented challenges.

The Internet Watch Foundation published in May 2018 ‘Trends in Online Child Sexual Exploitation: Examining the Distribution of Captures of Live-streamed Child Sexual Abuse. 2,082 images and videos were assessed as meeting the research criteria. I picked out these key findings:


• 96% depicted children on their own, typically in a home setting such as their own bedroom.
• 98% of imagery depicted children assessed as 13 years or younger.
• 96% of the imagery featured girls.

These statistics shows which how easy it is to contact children within their own homes in this age of technology, the age of the children and how girls are disproportionalely targeted and exploited. Will this aspect of the exploitation of children be mentioned? Our position papers on Human Trafficking, Prostitution and the Girl Child reflect and focus these issues very clearly for us. There is a week of Action June 10 – 17 2021 with various events. During the 109th International Labour Conference, a high level panel on June 10th will mark the World Day against Child Labour. The first part of the event will focus on a conversation on the new ILO-UNICEF global estimates and trends on child labour 2016 – 2021. Please ask question or put comments in the comments box.

Stop Child Abuse in Social Media – HLPF Side Event 15 July.

A very successful panel event was held on 15, July 2020 A full recording of the event is available on YouTube The panelists are extraordinary presenters, passionate, and knowledgeable in their area of expertise, all contributing to our objective ‘Stop Child Abuse in Social Media.’  The represented Government, NGO’s. The Tech Industry and Faith Based organizations and demonstrated how important broad and multi-faceted partnership and a whole of society approach are for systemic change.

Christ Herlinger of The National Catholic Reporter provided news coverage of the event entitled

Read the full article

The outcome of the side event was a set of Policy Recommendations addressed to National Governments, Technology Companies and Civil Society. We hope that these policy recommendations will be useful in your work. Also have a look at the 5 country ministerial voluntary principles to counter online child sexual exploitation and abuse. Check out Microsoft’s Contribution to Digital Safety. Of course this is not sufficient but it is a beginning. See Cathy Rowan notes on ethical investment and John Tanagho’s Powerpoint Presentation. A Summary of the Study done by International Justice Mission is available here

December 10 and 11 – Intergovernmental Conference to adopt the Global Compact on Migration – Marrakech, Morocco

Congregation of Our Lady of Charity are privileged to have two members present at the historic conference to adopt the Global Compact on Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration. Louise Arbour said the intergovernmental conference is ‘an opportunity to launch an unprecedented process of cooperation to harness the benefits of human mobility. ‘Marakesh Cecilie 3

Cecilie Kern attended the Global Forum on Migration and Development 5 – 7 December and is joined by Donatus Lili from Kenya for the Intergovernmental Conference on Monday and Tuesday.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

You can ready about the conference HERE  Last week we encouraged you to sign on to the Marrakech Women’s Rights Manifesto outlining the following concerns:   Participation, Non-Discrimination, End Violence, Safe Pathways, Labour Rights, Rights at International Borders and Equitable Development.  Today, Cecilie has joined with Civil Society partners on a statement that will be delivered at the opening of the Conference on Monday morning.  Once read it will be available for circulation.  As Monday is the 70th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights – what a great day to recognize and officially commit to implement the human rights of all migrants!  The flyer below has some details of the event to be hosted in Marrakesh. Screen Shot 2018-12-09 at 5.30.11 PM

Screen Shot 2018-12-09 at 5.36.26 PM

A tweet from Cecilie – Read the compendium on policy, practices and partnerships compiled by the NGO Committee on Migration  Click Compendium

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Some familiar faces from New York!

 

Catching a glimpse of Good Shepherd advocacy work from Paris to Indonesia, and from Washington to Santiago Chile.

An unusual moment to catch such a glimpse of advocacy work undertaken by Good Shepherd around the same time around the world.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Cristina Durante and Catherine Mutindi were actively engaged in the OECD meeting in Paris. Director of Good Shepherd International Foundation , Cristina Duranti participated on April 17th together with Amnesty International and other panelists at #Cobalt session at #OECDminerals in Paris, to present our DRC program in Kolwezi and discuss abuses suffered by the most vulnerable in the cobalt mining communities.  Catherine presented on community-based approaches to ending child labour in Kolwezi during an NGO sponsored side event.  This side event was in collaboration with Care and Protection of Children – CPC Learning Network  Photographs are from Facebook.  Catherine is with the co-found of CPC Learning Network Mark Canavera.    Read more    See the documentary

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Once again children to the fore – now from Indonesia!  Congratulations to  Maria Anggelina, who  won Hermann Gmeiner Award 2018.  Maria Anggelina is an Administrative staff, Kindergarten of Good Shepherd Sisters, Batam, Indonesia 
Maria Anggelina is a champion for the cause of children and marginalised women in Indonesia. She is particularly active in trying to save children who have been trafficked to Batam, an island in Indonesia’s Riau Archipelago. As part of her work with the Good Shepherd Sisters, Ms Anggelina and a team cooperate with law enforcement, the military, social services and church organisations to combat human trafficking on the island. Thanks to their efforts, at least 40 victims have been rescued and returned to their home villages. Seeing many cases, especially ones where children from her own hometown have fallen victim, makes Ms Anggelina very grateful to have been cared for by SOS Children’s Villages Flores in Indonesia. She realises, if it were not for SOS Chlldren’s Villages, she could have been a victim of trafficking herself. By raising the awareness of parents and children, Ms Anggelina hopes to reduce the number of trafficking victims.  Read more

Washingon

The National Advocacy Center of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd are organizing a Human Trafficking Conference for Tuesday, May 15, 2008

In Santiago Chile, the regional preparatory meeting for the High Level Political Forum (HLPF) which will take place in New York, July 9-18, 2018 is presently happening.  The High Level Political Forum meets annually  to evaluate implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.   We have two members present at the meeting in Santiago – Marta Iris and Erika Sanchez.  Hedwig Joehl attended a similar meeting in Geneva.  Georgette hopes to attend in Beirut (April 24 to 26)  and Donatus will attend with the Sisters from Senegal at Dakar (May 2 – 4) the meeting for Africa.  Read more HEREErika 5

Click on – Video Clip

 

 

July 30th ‘World Day Against Trafficking Persons.’ Who’s saying What…

Screen Shot 2017-07-28 at 9.51.57 PM

Screen Shot 2017-07-28 at 8.27.05 PM

This picture comes from the UN Geneva Website.   The theme of the day is “Let’s act now to protect and assist trafficking victims”.  Executive Director of UNODC has issued the following  STATEMENT calling attention to the links between conflict and trafficking and migrant smuggling.  “The New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants calls for nations, in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, to enter a global compact for safe, orderly and regular migration. In preparation, the UN General Assembly will hold a session in Vienna, Austria, on 4-5 September 2017 to discuss these issues, particularly the protection and assistance needed in connection with trafficking in persons and smuggling of migrants”.  (I hope to attend this session in Vienna on 4-5 September)

Special Rapporteurs Maria Grazia Giammarinaro (Special Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons especially Women and Children) and Maud de Boer-Buquicchio,  (Special Rapporteur on Sale and Sexual Exploitation of Children) speaking ahead of World Day Against Trafficking in Persons on Sunday 30 July issued this STATEMENT expressing much concern for children and what is happening to them. The title of the statement is ‘Migrant children at risk of trafficking and exploitation as current protection systems fail them’.

Screen Shot 2017-07-28 at 9.11.09 PMExplanation of the raison d’être of the day can be had in English   French and  Spanish

‘Act to Protect and Assist Trafficked Persons’

This year the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has chosen ‘act to protect and assist trafficked persons’ as the focus of the World Day. This topic highlights one of the most pressing issues of our time — the large mixed migration movements of refugees and migrants. The theme puts the spotlight on the significant impact of conflict and natural disasters, as well as the resultant, multiple risks of human trafficking that many people face. It addresses the key issue concerning trafficking responses: that most people are never identified as trafficking victims and therefore cannot access most of the assistance or protection provided.        #HumanTrafficking #EndHumanTrafficking

World Mission Magazine published by the Comboni Fathers in the Philippines published three articels on Human Trafficking in their July edition.

We are all complicit Winifred Doherty, Contributor.  A crime gainst children … Fr Shay Cullen, Preda Foundation, and Religious combating human trafficking, Clara Torres Acevedo, Comboni Missionary Sister.  Coming soon … the on line version!

Global Sisters Report has an article entitled “The worldwide debate on sex work: morality meets reality”

Lastly the GSIJP prayer for the the month was prepared on this very theme by Donatus Lili, the NGO Regional Designate for Africa.  While all of the material above is in English only the prayer is in three languages  English  French and Spanish

 

UNICEF’s Report ‘A child is a child: Protecting children on the move from violence, abuse and exploitation’ English, Spanish and French

French UNICEF                                                                  Lee ahora

UNICEF Report English Read the Report

Spanish UnicefLire maintenant

FAst Facts

Action Agenda

45 days to go until the World Day of Prayer and Action for Children 2010

Celebrate Universal Children’s Day November 20  –  Prepare by visiting the website for ideas at  http://www.dayofprayerandaction.org/    The google translation bar attached permits translation into French and Spanish together with a variety of other languages including  Arabic,  Czech, German, Hindi, Indonesian, Japanese Korean, Malay, Portuguese, Swahili, Thai and Vietnamese to mention some.

20th Anniversary of the Convention of the Rights of the Child at the United Nations.

Today the United Nations commemorated the 20th Anniversary of the Conventios n on the Rights of the Child.  You can see whole event by clicking on this link and finding 20th November, 2009, Special Events, archieved videos. http://www.un.org/webcast/2009.html   Much has been accomplished – the most ratified convention in the world- but a huge challenge remains –   64 million women aged 20-24 in the developing world reported they were married before 18 years, 1.2 million children were trafficked each year as of the year 2000, 14 million young women gave birth between the ages of 15 and 19 years old, 500 million-1.5 billion children have been affected by violence.  These statistics are recored in UNICEF’s Celebrating 20 years of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The State of the World’s Children.  Special Edition.  Click here to read more http://www.unicef.org/    If you require a hard copy of the report (in three languages – English, Spanish and French) why not use the comment at the bottom of the post.

Working Group on Trafficked Children (WGTC)

The Working Group on Trafficked Children is a relatively new group made up of a number of No’s interested in following this issue.  The next meeting is on August 11, 2009 in New York.  Good Shepherd is a member of this group.  If you are interested in becoming involved it is a good time to start because the group is defining it vision statement and drafting its strategic plan.  The organizational statement of the Working Group on Trafficked Children reads “concerned about the rapid increase in the trafficking of children, the NGO Working Group on Trafficked Children works for the formation of effective international and national policies, to end child trafficking.  We place particular emphasis on the special vulnerability of the girl child.”  To be effective we need your collaboration –  your expertise, your views and opinions. You can do this by replying on the comment line just below this post. 

Vision Statement

The ultimate goal of the Working Group on Trafficking in Children is to help end child trafficking. We aim to ensure that children are made visible in international counter-trafficking efforts at the United Nations.

Strategic Plan for 2009 to 2011

1.  Education and resource development              

a)  Educate and inform WGTC members:    i.  Develop vision statement and strategic plan.   ii.  Maintain and contribute to AirSet database.    iii  Monthly meetings,  including speakers.    iv.  Attend child trafficking events at the UN and in the NYC area.

b) Educate the public:       i.  Prepare fact sheets on child trafficking issues.   ii.  Develop community education programs.  iii.  Host UN side events.         iv. Create a resource bank – websites, films, books, tool kits on the issue of child trafficking.

2.  Networking            

a) Build and maintain contact with children’s advocacy groups, such as ECPAT:  (End Child Prostitution Child Pornography and Trafficking of Children for Sexual Purposes):   http://www.ecpat.net/EI/index.asp    i.  Members attend meeting of other groups.   ii.  Members share WGTC agenda with networks

b) Share successful advocacy efforts and best practices:      i.  Forward position papers to organization representatives.   ii Gather examples of successful advocacy on the ground.

c) Collaborate in hosting side events and other events. 

d) Exchange speakers.

3.  Advocacy           

a) Advocate for language that reflects the reality of the dignity of the human person.

b) Develop position papers:    i.  Defining “decent work” .  ii. Legalization vs abolitionist (prostitution).  iii Cruelty-free and free trade products.

c) Influence UN delegation positions on child trafficking:    i. Create list of friendly missions.   ii. Collaborate with missions who are leading on the issue of child trafficking.   iii.  Distribute position papers to UN missions.

d) Develop a relationship with UNODC (United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime):   i. Set up initial meeting to discuss WGTC involvement.   ii Distribute position papers to UNODC.